People centricity

People management, development and motivation

The Enel Group workforce at December 31, 2019 numbered 68,253 (down 1,019 compared with December 31, 2018). The contraction in the Group workforce reflects the impact of the balance between new hires and terminations during the period (-1,094) and the change in the scope of consolidation (a total of +75), which included the disposal of the Mercure plant by Enel Produzione in Italy, the acquisition in March of Tradewind in the United States, the disposal of the Reftinskaya GRES plant in Russia and the acquisition of PayTipper Network Srl, FlagPay Srl and PayTipper in Italy.

No.

 
 

at Dec. 31, 2019

at Dec. 31, 2018

Thermal Generation and Trading

9,432

10,286

Enel Green Power

7,957

7,478

Infrastructure and Networks

34,822

35,740

End-user Markets

6,336

6,492

Enel X

2,808

2,733

Services

6,013

5,646

Other

885

897

Total

68,253

69,272

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Change in workforce

No.

Balance at December 31, 2018

69,272

Hirings

3,726

Terminations

(4,820)

Change in the scope of consolidation

75

Balance at December 31, 2019

68,253

    

Breakdown of changes in workforce

  

2019

2018

Change

Hiring rate

 

5.5%

4.9%

0.6

11.6%

New hires by gender:

 

3,726

3,414

312

9.1%

- of which men

no.

2,702

2,410

292

12.1%

 

%

72.5%

70.6%

1.9

2.7%

- of which women

no.

1,024

1,004

20

2.0%

 

%

27.5%

29.4%

-1.9

-6.6%

New hires by age group:

 

3,726

3,414

312

9.1%

<30n.

1,865

1,622

243

15.0%

%

50.1%

47.5%

2,6

5.4%

30-50

n.

1,698

1,628

70

4.3%

%

45.6%

47.7%

-2,1

-4.5%

>50

no.

163

164

(1)

-0.6%

 

%

4.4%

4.8%

0-0.4

-9.2%

New hires by geographical area:

 

3,726

3,414

312

9.1%

Italy

no.

1,042

796

246

30.9%

 

%

28.0%

23.3%

4.7

20.0%

Iberia

no.

430

425

5

1.1%

 

%

11.5%

12.5%

-0.9

-7.4%

South America

no.

1,098

1,182

(84)

-7.1%

 

%

29.5%

34.6%

-5.1

-14.9%

Europe and Euro-Mediterranean Affairs

no.

528

345

183

53.0%

 

%

14.2%

10.1%

4.1

40.2%

North America

no.

435

594

(159)

-26.8%

 

%

11.7%

17.4%

-5.7

-32.9%

Africa, Asia and Oceania

no.

193

72

121

-

 

%

5.2%

2.1%

3.1

-

  

 

 

 

Turnover rate

 

7.1%

6.9%

0.02

3.1%

Terminations by gender:

 

4,820

4,746

74

1.6%

- of which men

no.

3,766

3,846

(80)

-2.1%

 

%

78.1%

79.8%

-1.7

-2.1%

- of which women

no.

1,054

900

154

17.1%

 

%

21.9%

18.7%

3.2

17.1%

Terminations by age group:

 

4,820

4,746

74

1.6%

<30

no.

626

499

127

25.5%

%

13.0%

10.4%

2.6

25.5%

30-50

no.

1,867

1,532

335

21.9%

%

38.7%

31.8%

7.0

21.9%

>50

no.

2,327

2,715

(388)

-14.3%

 

%

48.3%

56.3%

-8.1

-14.3%

Terminations by geographical area:

 

4,820

4,746

 

 

Italy

no.

1,607

1,668

(61)

-3.7%

 

%

33.3%

34.6%

-1.3

-3.7%

Iberia

no.

254

425

(171)

-40.3%

 

%

5.3%

8.8%

-3.5

-40.3%

South America

no.

2,103

1,862

241

12.9%

 

%

43.6%

38.6%

5.0

12.9%

Europe and Euro-Mediterranean Affairs

no.

369

384

(15)

-3.9%

 

%

7.7%

8.0%

-0.3

-3.9%

North America

no.

392

374

18

4.8%

 

%

8.1%

7.8%

0.4

4.8%

Africa, Asia and Oceania

no.

95

33

62

-

 

%

2.0%

0.7%

1.3

-

 

The energy transition is opening new horizons for the Group, not only for the business but above all for the people who work for us. In this context, Enel has begun specific upskilling and reskilling programs. The former focus on developing existing professional skills, adding new skills dictated by technology and innovative processes. Reskilling, on the other hand, seeks to create new job profiles, replacing skills that are becoming obsolete or no longer in demand, and to enable people to tackle new activities. Selection, hiring and internal mobility processes therefore play a key role, as do partnerships with universities.
Enel is going beyond the traditional concept of training, stimulating the individual’s ability to undertake a learning path according to his or her specific needs, passions and aptitudes. In 2019, more than 2.6 million hours of training were provided, covering managerial, technical, behavioral and language training, as well as health and safety, skills and digital culture. Enel has also set itself the goal of involving 100% of our employees in digital skills training by 2022; to date we have involved 46% of our people.

Average training hours per employee

 

2019

2018

Change

Average number of training hours

38.8

40.2

(1.4)

-3.5%

Average number of training hours by level:

    

- senior managers

58.4

40.3

18.1

44.9%

- middle managers

44.9

42.2

2.7

6.5%

- office staff

29.6

33.5

(3.9)

-11.6%

- blue collar

49.6

50.1

(0.5)

-0.9%

Average number of training hours by gender:

    

- men

39.7

41.2

(1.5)

-3.5%

- women

35.0

36.2

(1.2)

-3.3%

 

In 2019, the process of evaluating quantitative and qualitative performance involved various levels of the Group’s personnel in a fluid and comprehensive exchange process. In 2019, 100% of eligible personnel(1) were involved, of whom 99% were evaluated. Quantitative appraisals, in turn, were conducted for employees with variable remuneration plans, which involved the assignment of specific targets. The corporate-climate survey plays an important role within the Company as it enables the identification of areas of improvement in three key areas – wellness, engagement and safety – and the gathering suggestions on working life issues and aspects. The action plans developed following the 2018 survey are being implemented.
Enel’s commitment to promoting diversity and inclusion is a process that started in 2013 with the adoption of our policy on human rights, followed in 2015 by our global diversity and inclusion policy, In 2019, the global workplace harassment policy was published. It addresses the issue of sexual harassment and other forms of harassment, making explicit the principle of respect for the inegrity and dignity of the individual in the workplace. Enel’s approach is based on the fundamental principles, enunciated in the diversity and inclusion policy, of non-discrimination, equal opportunities and human dignity in all its forms, inclusion and promoting work-life balance. The application of our policies has enabled us to develop global and local projects to promote diversity in terms of gender, age, nationality and disability, and to advance the culture of inclusion at all levels of the Group and in every situation that can be encountered in the workplace. The impact of these policies is being monitored on the basis of a detailed set of indicators associated with the various actions and contexts. More specifically, Enel has set the public objective of ensuring equal gender representation in the initial stages of the selection and recruiting process (about 50% by 2021). In 2019, in line with the established trajectory, women accounted for 42% of participants in selection processes, an increase on the 39% registered in 2018.

 (1) Eligible employees: employees who have an open-ended contract and were employed for at least three months in 2019. Provisional figure as the completion of the assessment process has been postponed until May 2, 2020 owing to the COVID-19 emergency.

Diversity and inclusion

  

2019

2018

Change

Workforce by gender:

 

68,253

69,272

(1,019)

-1,5%

- of which men

no.

53,933

54,972

(1,039)

-1,9%

 

%

79%

81%

-2

-1,9%

- of which women

no.

14,320

14,300

20

0,1%

 

%

21%

21%

0%

0,1%

Workforce by age group:

 

68.253

69,272

(1,019)

-1,5%

<30

%

11.6%

11.8%

-0.2%

-1.9%

30-50

%

54.6%

57.0%

-2.4%

-4.2%

>50

%

33.8%

31.2%

2.6%

8.4%

Workforce by level:

 

68,253

69,272

(1,019)

-1.5%

- manager (%)

 

2.0%

1.9%

0.1

2.8%

- middle manager (%)

 

16.6%

15.9%

0.7

4.6%

- white collar (%)

 

53.1%

50.1%

3.0

6.1%

- blue collar (%)

 

28.3%

32.1%

-3.8

-11.9%

Disabled personnel or personnel belonging the protected categories (%)

 

3.3%

3.2%

0.1

3.2%

  

 

 

 

 

Women in management positions (no.)

 

285

265

20

7.5%

Workplace health and safety

Enel considers employee health, safety and general wellbeing to be its the most valuable asset, one to be preserved both at work and at home. We are committed to developing and promoting a strong culture of safety throughout the world in order to ensure a healthy work environment. Quality and safety must go hand in hand. All of us are responsible for our own health and safety and that of the people with whom we interact and, as provided for in the Enel “Stop Work Policy”, they are required to promptly report and halt any situation of risk or unsafe behavior. The constant commitment of us all, the integration of safety both in our processes and in our training, the reporting and analysis of near misses, rigor in the selection and management of contractors, controls over quality, the sharing of experience throughout the Group and benchmarking against the leading international players are all cornerstones of Enel’s culture of safety.

In 2019 the SHE 2.019 project was launched, continuing the activities of the SHE 365 project. It involves both the Group’s personnel and suppliers in initiatives concerning safety, health and the environment. During last year, this concrete and operational commitment was increasingly focused on the Group’s business, strengthening the lines of work along three main lines:

  • the Commitment Chain, focusing on preventing severe or fatal injuries; 
  • Inter BL Integration, to strengthen the synergy of the actions of the individual Business Lines with the Countries and Regions; 
  • Contractors’ Engagement to improve the safety standards of companies that work with Enel. 

Safety is integrated into tender processes, and we closely monitor our contractors’ performance both upstream with our qualification system and ongoing as the contracts progress through numerous control processes and tools such as the Supplier Performance Management (SPM) system. During 2019, we prepared the HSE Terms document, attached to all contracts, which companies must sign when contracts are awarded. The document, unique for the Group, defines the requirements regarding health, safety and significant environmental aspects that the contractor must comply with and enforce with their subcontractors during the execution of works. In addition, considerable impulse was given to the “Safety Supplier Assessment”, specific audits on safety issues to be undertaken at the supplier’s premises and on worksites. The audits are performed during the qualification phase for each new supplier, in cases where critical issues have emerged (severe or fatal injuries) or where the supplier has received a low SPM rating. In 2019, a total of 746 contractor assessments were performed.

     

 

Unit

2019

2018

Change

Injury frequency rate (FR) - Enel (1)

i

0.899

0.943

(0.04)

-4.7%

Fatal injuries at Enel

no.

1

1

-

-

“High consequence” injuries at Enel (2)

no.

3

5

(2)

-40.0%

Fatal injuries at contractors (3)

no.

6

7

(1)

-14.3%

“High consequence” injuries at contractors (2)

no.

16

13

3

23.1%

(1) This index is calculated as the ratio between the number of injuries (all injury events including those with three or fewer missed days of work) and hours worked/1,000,000.
(2) Sum of:

  • injuries that at December 31, 2019 involved more than 6 months of absence from work; 
  • injuries that at December 31, 2019 were still under investigation and are considered serious (initial prognosis > 30 days;
  • injuries classified as “life changing accidents” (LCA), regardless of the number of missed days of work connected with them. 

(3) For 2018, considering all the areas in which the Group operates and the activities managed, including companies accounted for using the equity method and companies operating under the BSO (build, sell and operate) model, the number of fatal injuries totaled 8.

In 2019, the injury frequency rate (FR) for Enel employees declined to 0.90 injuries for every million hours worked (-5% compared with 2018), confirming the effectiveness of the safety strategy and policies implemented in the Group.
In 2019, 1 fatal accident occurred involving an employee of the Enel Group, and 6 fatal accidents involving contractors. The causes were mainly associated with mechanical incidents. Also in 2019, 3 “high consequence” accidents occurred involving employees of the Enel Group, and 16 such accidents involving contractors, mainly of a mechanical nature.
The Enel Group has established a structured health management system, based on prevention measures to develop a corporate culture that promotes psycho-physical health, organizational wellbeing and a balance between personal and professional life. With this in mind, the Group conducts global and local awareness campaigns to promote healthy lifestyles, sponsors screening programs aimed at preventing the onset of diseases and guarantees the provision of medical services. More specifically, we have a policy for the prevention of local diseases and provide support in the event of diseases or accidents abroad. A smartphone application has also been introduced with travel information, a guideline on vaccinations, and a new global insurance policy has been taken out for all employees traveling abroad. Furthermore, the Group constantly monitors epidemiological and health developments in order to implement plans for preventive and protective measures to preserve the health of its employees and those who work for the Group, both locally and globally. In addition, the Enel Group has a systematic and ongoing process for identifying and assessing work-related stress risks, in accordance with the “Stress at Work Prevention and Wellbeing at Work Promotion” policy, for the prevention, identification and management of stress in work situations, also providing recommendations aimed at promoting a culture of organizational wellbeing.
A number of health and safety communication campaigns were conducted during the year in areas of specific concern for the Company, while some 692,000 hours of training were provided to Enel personnel. In 2019, innovation projects on safety were continued and new initiatives were launched, focusing on prevention and protection measures, the execution and analysis of corrective controls, as well as staff training.

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Responsible relations with communities

The energy sector is undergoing a profound transformation and our ever greater emphasis on social and environmental factors, together with an inclusive approach, allows us to create long-term value for Enel and for the communities in which we operate. This model has been incorporated along the entire value chain: analyzing the needs of communities right from the development phases of new activities; taking account of social and environmental factors in the establishment of sustainable worksites; managing assets and plants to make them sustainable development platforms to the benefit of the territories in which they are located. Another development was the broadening of this approach in the design, development and supply of energy services and products, helping to build cities that are increasingly sustainable and deploying new technologies. Enel is committed to respecting the rights of communities and to contributing to their economic and social development, interacting every day with a multitude of stakeholders. In 2019, Enel, with some 1,800 projects and more than 4 million beneficiaries2, contributed to the establishment of ecosystems in the countries in which it operates to guarantee access to electricity in rural areas and address inadequate power supplies (SDG 7), reaching 7.9 million beneficiaries in 2019 (with a target of 10 million beneficiaries by 2030); promoted the economic and social development in the communities (SDG 8), reaching 2.1 million beneficiaries in 2019 (with a target of 8.0 million beneficiaries by 2030) and supported quality education (SDG 4), reaching 1.3 million beneficiaries in 2019 (with a target of 2.5 million beneficiaries by 2030). Contributing to this were also more than 800 partnerships with local organizations, social enterprises, universities, international associations and non-governmental organizations in the various countries.

(2) Beneficiaries are the people for which a project is implemented. Enel only considers direct beneficiaries in the current year. The number of beneficiaries includes the activities and projects carried out in all the areas in which the Group operates (for companies within the scope of the NFS, the number of beneficiaries does not include companies accounted for using the equity method, Group foundations and non-profit organizations and companies operating within the Build, Sell and Operate mechanism).

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